Another great outing at Babcock Webb, 6.23.19

Summer temps are certainly here.  While cycling at Babcock Webb, take more water than you think you need.  It gets hot in the woods. Cycling in the upper 80’s with feels like temps in the high 90’s to low 100’s, forgetting water can be trouble.  Drink before you are thirsty and continue drinking regularly and your body will thank you.  Additionally, don’t forget that sunscreen!  Get all your needed info about the facilities available here: Babcock Webb

 

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Cycling the Gravel Roads of Babcock Webb

Exploring unpaved Florida, bicycles are taking to the gravel roads. 

Gravel riding is the fastest growing segment in cycling and if you haven’t tried it you really should. It’s gets you away from traffic and into some off the beaten path areas. I spent a couple years listening to people rave about gravel riding and I’d occasionally use my mountain bike for gravel events. That was fine but eventually I wanted something with drop bars for gravel and once I pulled the trigger on a Felt Breed there was no going back.

My gravel bike is now my most ridden bike and the main place I ride it is Webb Wildlife Management Area. It’s a 30 drive mile from my house but it’s well worth it. I can ride for 50 miles and barely see a vehicle. Mostly I see birds, deer, and gators. Lots of gators!

The surface in the wildlife management area varies from smooth gravel to barely-there double track but the park area has a paved scenic road with little traffic that winds along the shore of Webb Lake for 10 miles. Others have caught onto the joy of riding at Webb and now there’s even a couple of events that utilize the roads there but on most days you’ll be lucky to see another rider. Riding in the WMA requires a little bit of local knowledge but maps are available and Bike Bistro employees can give you all the information you need. (PC Carlin)

The Babcock Webb Wildlife Preserve is a great place to ride. This is one way to hone those “off-road” bike handling skills, and enjoy the wilderness of SW Florida.  Located off I-75 at Exit 156, it is a short drive from Ft. Myers.  Parking, provided by the county, is $1 an hour or $5 for the day.  

Along with the excellent bike riding areas, Babcock/Webb provides recreational opportunities.

These vary from hunting and fishing to hiking and wildlife viewing.  There is a ranger station , pavilions, rest rooms, firearms and archery range, and other amenities.

Paul on his Kona Gravel Bike
Paul on his Kona Gravel Bike

With more than 65,000 acres of the finest intermixed pine flatwoods and freshwater marsh in the state (sprinkled with hardwood hammocks and dry prairie), this Wildlife Management Area will keep you busy all day long. Bike the roads, walk the trails, or take your canoe out onto Webb Lake. 194 species of birds have been recorded on this property and two of the most-sought-after are singing Bachman’s Sparrows in the spring and easily-accessed Red-cockaded Woodpecker clusters. Some of the other highlights for this property include American Bitterns and Sedge Wrens in winter and Northern Bobwhite, Least Bitterns, King Rail, Sandhill Crane, Wild Turkey, and Brown-headed Nuthatches throughout the year. Other species to look for include Sherman’s Fox Squirrel and Florida Bonneted Bats. (Thanks www.Floridabirdingtrail.com )

Babcock Webb Wildlife Preserve
Tree lined dirt roads

The Dirty Kanza was a first of its kind of gravel race for drop bar bikes.

That event, which, since its inception in 2006 with just 34 riders, has become the bellwether for the gravel industry. More than double the number of riders were on the start line in 2018 compared to 2014, and demand has become so high that this year the race instituted a lottery system for admission. Organizers also added a concurrent race in 2018, a 350-mile self-supported ride called the DKXL, and they have expanded the brand to several other fun rides, training camps, and bikepacking tours throughout the year.

A convergence of factors has fueled gravel’s growing popularity.  Thanks to its grassroots heritage, the gravel scene also serves as an antidote to the high-tech, super-competitive mentality of road riding. Most of today’s popular gravel grinders, including the Dirty Kanza, started out as small-scale events with no entry fees. And despite their growth, they’ve tried to maintain their low-key attitude. (www.outsideonline.com)

Christoph and Terry
Christoph and Terry
Riding the wildlife preserve
Riding the wildlife preserve

 

Andrew C. on his Surly Troll Gravel Bike
Andrew C. on his Surly Troll Gravel Bike
Gravel Roads of the Babcock Webb Wildlife Preserve
Gravel Roads of the Babcock Webb Wildlife Preserve

No specific bike is needed to ride at Babcock / Webb, however a wider tire is recommended.  Since no specific bike is needed, get out there and ride!

Fakahatchee Grind

The Fakahatchee Grind is a ride like no other. What other event routes you through Big Cypress, the Picayune Strand and the Fakahatchee Strand all in one day. You even have the option of camping at the park which normally isn’t allowed. The ride offers three beautiful but challenging courses; an 85 mile “Full Grind”, a 64 mile “Half Grind” and a 45 mile backcountry route. All the routes will test your limits. I’ve done the backcountry and the half grind with the former being better suited to a mountain bike and the latter best on a gravel bike but either bike works for all routes. Just make sure you’re tires are fat enough. This unique event is quickly becoming a must-do ride for hardy souls looking for off-road adventure in south Florida. Thanks to Terry McLaughlin and Patrick “PC” Carlin for the images and write up. Link To Strava,  Copy Of GPX File

 

Dirty Ride

RAAM For The Record 2018

In 2016 The Bike Bistro and a legion of supporters fueled our four-man “Bean Team” to compete in the Race Across America (RAAM) from Oceanside, CA to Annapolis, MD. This band of amateur cycling brothers came in fourth in their division just behind three professional teams! They rode across the country in six days, 13 hours! Plus, they raised $27,000 for Operation Homefront in support of US Veteran’s and their families.
This year they have begun training to set the record in the 2-Man RAAM, 2018. We’re behind them again – all the way to the finish. Please watch their story and donate at www.gofundme.com/RAAM-2018. For every donation over $50 in the month of July The Bike Bistro will give your bike a FREE Espresso Ride Tune, a $43.95 value. Thank you for your support!